Becoming Catholic

Interested in becoming a Catholic?

Sacraments For Children

What, when and how to go about it?

Youth Group

Jump in and join our youth group (Yrs 7-10)

Mass Times

Weekends
Saturday : 6.00 PM (Vigil)
Sunday : 9.30 AM (Family), 6.00 PM

Weekdays
Monday : 9.00 AM
Wednesday : 9.00 AM
Thursday : 6.00 PM
Friday : 9.00 AM

Indonesian Mass
Sunday : 3.30 PM

French Mass
Every Third Sunday 11.00 AM

Reconciliation
Monday 9.30 AM or by appointment

Reconciliation
Thursdays during Lent at 5:30 PM, followed by Mass 6pm

Baptism
First Sunday - 11am, bookings required

Weddings
By Appointment

Sacraments
Contact parish office

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Latest News

MORNING TEA

after the Sunday 9am mass is a firmly established tradition at OLR. Today we would like to sincerely thank Myrna and Domingo who have resigned from the roster after several years of contributing generously to the catering. Also Eileen who resigned some time ago.

All the volunteers who help on Sundays provide much of the refreshments at their own expense and all parishioners are deeply indebted to them.

We are now seeking any additional volunteers who would be prepared to help on the basis of one Sunday per month. Also we welcome any donations of cake, biscuits, dips, etc at any time. Please contact Margaret or Roy 9313 8334.

FAMILY GROUP NEXT MEETING

Tuesday 14 July 6.30pm, dinner at the Chinese Restaurant East Village Zetland (NOTE: Level 3). Bookings: Martin O’Loughlin 9662 8559 or oloughlinm@bigpond.com.au.   All Welcome.

WE ALL STAND ON SACRED GROUND:

LEARN, RESPECT & CELEBRATE

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ unique and timeless connection to land is the special focus and theme of this year’s National NAIDOC Week celebrations. The theme highlights Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ strong spiritual and cultural connection to land and sea.

The National NAIDOC Committee encourages all Australians, young and old, to embrace the 2015 National NAIDOC theme and to respect and celebrate local and national sites of significance or ‘sacred places’ and to learn of their traditional names, history and stories.

http://www.naidoc.org.au/news/2015-national-naidoc-week-theme

MARRIAGE AND ITS IMPORTANCE IN THE SOCIAL FABRIC OF OUR NATION

Speaker: Archbishop Anthony Fisher
Date & Time: 22nd July, 6:00pm
Venue: The School Hall, St Mary’s Cathedral College

All people of goodwill are welcome to attend and hear from this our Archbishop on this topical issue. We especially encourage you to bring friends and family who have an innate understand what marriage is, but do not fully understand why the Church has such a clear position on its definition. All those wishing to attend are urged to register as soon as possible by emailing info@smom.org.au.

DO YOU CARE ABOUT PEACE, JUSTICE, ECOLOGY OR DEVELOPMENT?

Subscribe to ‘Act Justly’ the monthly newsletter from the Archdiocese Justice and Peace Office and keep up to date with social justice issues you care about. Learn about Catholic social teaching and find out what’s going on in the Sydney Archdiocese. To subscribe, view archived copies or learn more, visit the Justice and Peace Office website, http://www.justiceandpeace.org.au.

THE MUSTARD SEED BOOKSHOP ANNUAL SALE

23 – 25 July, in store only. Save up to 85% off selected items, with a minimum 20% off everything in store! Catholic books, DVDs, CDs, pious goods, statues and T-shirts. 3 Keating St Lidcombe – 9646 9000. www.mustardseed.org.au

“Rejection Purifies Love” (Mark 6:1-6)

One of the items of the retreat that I was conducting in Brisbane was “sharing” from those who attended the retreat in response to a presentation that I provided to the group. Following a session that covered the topic “betrayal, hurt, wounds and healing”, I was surprised from the open-sharing of emotion from an elderly lady. The lady was seated next to her husband, yet she stated that she feels unloved by her husband for hearing constant complaints from him every day. The thing that he complained most about was that she was either too talkative or not nice to him; however he considered that she is always nice to other people.

The Gospel for this Sunday is about Jesus who was rejected in his home town. He was facing a severe test as both the son of a carpenter, and as a rabbi with his disciples. We know that a rabbi in a Jewish society is well respected. We could imagine Jesus’ feeling deep down in His heart when he said: “A prophet is not without honor, except in his own country, and among his own kin, and his own house” (Mark 6:4). He was upset and felt rejected by His own people.

Reflecting on the experience of Jesus and the elderly lady, I recall I was once informed by a formator in the novitiate that those who are close to us are the people who not only invest so much on our growth, but also create the most hurt and wounds. These people are family members, relatives, neighbors and co-workers who relate to us on a regular basis. And even though Jesus was upset with the way they treated Him, He never stopped loving them. The experience of the couple that I met in the recent retreat telling me that even though they sometimes failed to treat each other in a nice way, they still loved each other and were proud to look forward to their golden anniversary in 2016.

Normally we are expecting people to treat us in a way that pleases us. However, our expectations are not always met. Unmet expectations should not prevent us from loving people because it is our nature to be loving for people and with people. In addition, we often treat people who are close to us in a manner that may contribute to their growth in a positive way. Every time I do good things for others I have created life to the person. Spreading the good news is not only telling people that they are loved by God but showing them in a very simple way that they too can feel that they are loved.